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BIOLOGY (BIOL)

099  Introduction to Biology (2-2-3).  This course is designed to provide a basic background in the area of biology for students planning to take general biology. BIOL 099 does not fulfill general studies requirements.

101  General Biology I (3-0-3). An introductory course concerned with the chemical and physical organization of life, cytology, plant anatomy and physiology, plant diversity, and ecology.  PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101.

102  General Biology II (3-0-3). An introductory course concerned with heredity gene function, evolution, human anatomy and physiology, and animal diversity.  PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101.

103  General Biology I Laboratory (0-2-1). Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 101. CO/PR: BIOL 101.

104  General Biology II Laboratory (0-2-1). Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 102. CO/PR: BIOL 102.

202  Microbiology (3-0-3). The biology of microorganisms and the immune system; control of microorganisms and disease; applied microbiology.  PR: BIOL 101/104 and 102/104 OR CO: BIOL 210/211..

204  Microbiology Laboratory (0-3-1). Laboratory session designed to complement BIOL 202 lectures. The student will learn basic microbiological techniques through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and in vitro experiments.  CO/PR:  BIOL 202.

210  Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3-0-3).  A study of the anatomy and physiology of cells as well as the integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.  PR:  Eligibility for Engl 101 or permission of the instructor and student’s advisor.

211 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (0-2-1).  Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 210.  Sessions consist of observing, reporting, and/or interpreting biological phenomena.  CO/PR:  BIOL 210. 

212  Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3-0-3).  A continuation of BIOL 210.  A study of the anatomy and physiology of the digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, renal, and reproductive systems.  PR:  BIOL 210.

213 Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (0-2-1).  Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 212 sessions consist of observing, reporting, and/or interpreting biological phenomena.  CO/PR:  BIOL 212. 

290  Topics in Biology (1-4 hours credit). Formal courses in diverse areas of biology. Course may be repeated for different topics. Specific courses will be announced and indicated by subtitle on the student transcript. PR: 4 credits in Natural Science.

300  Ecology (2-3-3). A study of the relationships between organisms and the physical and biotic environment. Field work emphasizes the local area. PR: BIOL 101, 103 OR consent of instructor.

301  Introduction to Genetics (3-0-3). A study of Mendelian inheritance and modern genetics; the transition of biological characteristics from parent to off-spring, linkage, crossing over, and chromosome mapping; gene mutation; extension of the genetic theories; the role of genes in development. PR: BIOL 102, 104.

303  Animal Kingdom (2-4-4). Lecture, demonstrations, laboratory and library work to illustrate the fundamental principles of vertebrate and invertebrate structure, development and evolution. PR: BIOL 102, 104.

306 Botany (3-3-4). Form, function, growth, development, and reproduction of major groups of plants.  PR:  BIOL 101 and 103.

310  Nutrition (3-0-3). Background necessary to comprehend and communicate to patients the science and art of the sum processes involved in taking in nutrients, assimilating and utilizing them. PR: Eight semester hours of lab courses in biology or chemistry.

400  Pharmacology (3-0-3). An introduction to the basic concepts of drug actions and therapeutic principles governing drug therapy. Emphasis is placed on general mechanisms, therapeutic uses and toxicity of protypic drugs. PR: Eight semester hours of lab courses in biology or chemistry.

401  Pathogenic Microbiology (3-2-4). A course concerned with the characteristics of pathogenic microorganisms encountered in the health care profession. PR: BIOL 202, 204.

402 Immunology (4-2-4).  An introduction to the basic concepts of immunology, terminology, and nomenclature to understand the cellular and molecular components of the immune system, how the immune system recognizes and responds to foreign antigens. Course also examines antigen-antibody reactions (serology), transplantation, immunodeficiency diseases, hypersensitivity reactions and cancer immunology. PR:  BIOL 202 and 204L.

410  Cell Biology (3-2-4).  A study of cell structure and function beginning at the molecular level of organization and proceeding through different levels of complexity. PR: BIOL 101, 102, 103, 104.

490  Topics in Biology (1-4 hours credit). Advanced formal courses in diverse areas of biology. Course may be repeated for different topics. Specific topics will be announced and indicated by subtitle on the student transcript. PR: Consent of instructor.